Health and Wellness

This field focuses on researching and providing health care to human populations. While the underlying principles of other areas of science are used in this field, health science concentrates solely on health problems and outcomes. Whether you're interested in medicine, nutrition, or public health, this field can provide a pathway to a career making a difference in the health, and lives, of others.

What is Health Science?

Health science is a broad field that focuses on health care and health outcomes.

 

Any individual you see to treat or manage an illness or disease is most likely in the health science field. This includes physicians, dentists, pharmacists, nurses, and optometrists, to name a few. But the field also includes paramedics, genetic counselors, home health aids, athletic trainers, dietitians, speech-language pathologists, and more. Some of these careers or fields require specialized training with or without a college degree.

 

Many of these careers include an interest in educating the public, whether it involves counseling an individual patient or launching public health campaigns. If you’re interested in the body or health care, there is a career in health science for you.

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Programs & Education

Online

Certified Clinical Data Registries: The Future for the CMS Quality Payment Program

As clinicians respond to the pandemic, we recognize the most important priority is ensuring patients get needed care. During this time, however, Cente...

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Online

SUPPORT Act: Addressing the Opioid Crisis with the PDMP and Data Governance

Designed For: Physicians, physician assistants, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, nurses, and other healthcare professionals Provided By: CyncHealt...

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Online

What IS Information Blocking? Specifics of the Rule

3 part webinar course geared towards clinicians on the information blocking rule and how it affects them and their organizations and workflows. This w...

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In-person

Clarkson College Nurse Aide (CNA) Course

Omaha, NE

The Clarkson College Nurse Aide (CNA) course prepares non-licensed individuals to provide safe, effective and caring services to patients, residents a...

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In-person

Eureka! Program at Girls Inc. of Omaha

Omaha, NE

Girls Inc. of Omaha's mission is to inspire all girls to be strong, smart and bold. Eureka! is a 5 year STEM intensive program from middle school to h...

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Online

uBEATS

Exposing students early on to science, health science, and STEM shapes their attitude, aptitude, and confidence to pursue these types of careers in th...

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More Offerings

Example Careers

Genetic Counselor

Education Requirements
Master's degree and board certification

Average Salary
$82k


Genetic counselors provide information to an individual or family member about risks for a variety of inherited conditions. They conduct in-depth interviews and take comprehensive medical histories of individuals to assess the risk for genetic disorders and birth defects. Genetic counselors can use DNA testing results to identify risk for inherited conditions. They also work with other health care providers to provide information about these conditions.

Physician

Education Requirements
M.D. or D.O. and licensure

Average Salary
$208k


Physicians, also called doctors, diagnose and treat illnesses, injuries, and chronic conditions. Physicians can specialize in a certain bodily system or function, such as cardiology (the heart and circulatory system) or nephrology (the kidneys and renal system). They can also choose to work with certain populations, like pediatricians, who treat children. Physicians work in hospitals, doctors' offices, or surgery centers. They may also conduct research or work for the government or military. Becoming a physician requires considerable training and preparation, and involves several years of post-secondary education.

Phlebotomist

Education Requirements
Postsecondary nondegree program and certification

Average Salary
$35k


Phlebotomists draw blood from patients to be used in tests, blood donations, or research. They follow sanitary procedures to keep patients, and themselves, clean and safe from blood-borne pathogens. Phlebotomists can work in a variety of environments, including hospitals, doctors' offices, laboratories, and blood donation centers. A postsecondary nondegree award from a phlebotomy program is typically required to enter the field.

Dental Hygienist

Education Requirements
Associate's degree and state licensure

Average Salary
$67k


Dental hygienists provide preventative oral care to patients, like teeth cleanings. They use instruments in their work. Dental hygienists also educate patients on oral health care techniques and look for signs of oral diseases. They almost always work under the supervision of a dentist. Education requirements typically include an associate's degree in dental hygiene and state licensure.

Nurse Practitioner

Education Requirements
Master's degree

Average Salary
$102K


A nurse practitioner (NP) provides primary and specialty healthcare. Like a physician, he or she assesses and diagnoses patients, orders laboratory tests, prescribes medications, and manages health conditions. NPs also educate their patients on how to make healthy lifestyle choices.

Mental Health Counselor

Education Requirements
Bachelor's degree or Master's degree

Average Salary
$52K


Mental health counselor counsel individuals and groups to promote optimum mental health. they help individuals deal with subjects pertaining to mental and emotional health. This process includes developing skills and strategies with patients to help them solve problems, collecting information about clients, and counseling clients and patients.

Physical Therapist

Education Requirements
Doctorate degree

Average Salary
$91K


Physical therapist evaluate and record a patient's progress. They help injured or ill people improve movement and manage pain. they are often an important part of preventive care, rehabilitation, and treatment for patients with chronic conditions, illnesses, or injuries. While there are no specific undergraduate majors required, many physical therapists get their start with a degree in biology, physics, psychology, healthcare, chemistry, kinesiology, or exercise science.

Career salary data provided by: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook handbook and O*NET OnLine.

If health science is not your thing, there are other areas of science!

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